Uncategorized

Amazing funny girl and group dog

Two of the most popular pets are dogs and cats. Other animals commonly kept include: pigs, ferrets, rabbits; rodents, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, rats, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as parrots, passerines, and fowl; reptile pets, such as turtles, lizards and snakes; aquatic pets, such as fish, freshwater and saltwater snails, and frogs; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs. Small pets may be grouped together as pocket pets, while the equine and bovine group include the largest companion animals.

Pets provide their owners (or “guardians”[1]) both physical and emotional benefits. Walking a dog can provide both the human and the dog with exercise, fresh air, and social interaction. Pets can give companionship to people who are living alone or elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. There is a medically approved class of therapy animals, mostly dogs or cats, that are brought to visit confined humans, such as children in hospitals or elders in nursing homes. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive or emotional goals with patients.

Some scholars, ethicists and animal rights organizations have raised concerns over keeping pets because of the lack of autonomy and objectification of nonhuman animals.[2]
It is widely believed among the public, and among many scientists, that pets probably bring mental and physical health benefits to their owners;[25] a 1987 NIH statement cautiously argued that existing data was “suggestive” of a significant benefit.[26] A recent dissent comes from a 2017 RAND study, which found that at least in the case of children, having a pet per se failed to improve physical or mental health by a statistically significant amount; instead, the study found children who were already prone to be more healthy (such as white children living in homes rather than apartments) were more likely to get pets in the first place.[25][27][28] Unfortunately, conducting long-term randomized trials to settle the issue would be costly or infeasible.
Pets might have the ability to stimulate their caregivers, in particular the elderly, giving people someone to take care of, someone to exercise with, and someone to help them heal from a physically or psychologically troubled past.[26][29][30] Animal company can also help people to preserve acceptable levels of happiness despite the presence of mood symptoms like anxiety or depression.[31] Having a pet may also help people achieve health goals, such as lowered blood pressure, or mental goals, such as decreased stress.[32][33][34][35][36][37] There is evidence that having a pet can help a person lead a longer, healthier life. In a 1986 study of 92 people hospitalized for coronary ailments, within a year 11 of the 29 patients without pets had died, compared to only 3 of the 52 patients who had pets.[30] Having pet(s) was shown to significantly reduce triglycerides, and thus heart disease risk, in the elderly.[38] A study by the National Institute of Health found that people who owned dogs were less likely to die as a result of a heart attack than those who didn’t own one.[39] There is some evidence that pets may have a therapeutic effect in dementia cases.[40] Other studies have shown that for the elderly, good health may be a requirement for having a pet, and not a result.[41] Dogs trained to be guide dogs can help people with vision impairment. Dogs trained in the field of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) can also benefit people with other disabilities.[26][42]

Two of the most popular pets are dogs and cats. Other animals commonly kept include: pigs, ferrets, rabbits; rodents, such as gerbils, hamsters, chinchillas, rats, and guinea pigs; avian pets, such as parrots, passerines, and fowl; reptile pets, such as turtles, lizards and snakes; aquatic pets, such as fish, freshwater and saltwater snails, and frogs; and arthropod pets, such as tarantulas and hermit crabs. Small pets may be grouped together as pocket pets, while the equine and bovine group include the largest companion animals.

Pets provide their owners (or “guardians”[1]) both physical and emotional benefits. Walking a dog can provide both the human and the dog with exercise, fresh air, and social interaction. Pets can give companionship to people who are living alone or elderly adults who do not have adequate social interaction with other people. There is a medically approved class of therapy animals, mostly dogs or cats, that are brought to visit confined humans, such as children in hospitals or elders in nursing homes. Pet therapy utilizes trained animals and handlers to achieve specific physical, social, cognitive or emotional goals with patients.

Some scholars, ethicists and animal rights organizations have raised concerns over keeping pets because of the lack of autonomy and objectification of nonhuman animals.[2]
It is widely believed among the public, and among many scientists, that pets probably bring mental and physical health benefits to their owners;[25] a 1987 NIH statement cautiously argued that existing data was “suggestive” of a significant benefit.[26] A recent dissent comes from a 2017 RAND study, which found that at least in the case of children, having a pet per se failed to improve physical or mental health by a statistically significant amount; instead, the study found children who were already prone to be more healthy (such as white children living in homes rather than apartments) were more likely to get pets in the first place.[25][27][28] Unfortunately, conducting long-term randomized trials to settle the issue would be costly or infeasible.
Pets might have the ability to stimulate their caregivers, in particular the elderly, giving people someone to take care of, someone to exercise with, and someone to help them heal from a physically or psychologically troubled past.[26][29][30] Animal company can also help people to preserve acceptable levels of happiness despite the presence of mood symptoms like anxiety or depression.[31] Having a pet may also help people achieve health goals, such as lowered blood pressure, or mental goals, such as decreased stress.[32][33][34][35][36][37] There is evidence that having a pet can help a person lead a longer, healthier life. In a 1986 study of 92 people hospitalized for coronary ailments, within a year 11 of the 29 patients without pets had died, compared to only 3 of the 52 patients who had pets.[30] Having pet(s) was shown to significantly reduce triglycerides, and thus heart disease risk, in the elderly.[38] A study by the National Institute of Health found that people who owned dogs were less likely to die as a result of a heart attack than those who didn’t own one.[39] There is some evidence that pets may have a therapeutic effect in dementia cases.[40] Other studies have shown that for the elderly, good health may be a requirement for having a pet, and not a result.[41] Dogs trained to be guide dogs can help people with vision impairment. Dogs trained in the field of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) can also benefit people with other disabilities.[26][42]

Most Popular

To Top